Making projects

Knitsonification

Sunday, February 8, 2015

Ooh heck, there's been lots going on in the past few months and there's a blog post backlog mounting up!

First, I should mention that I'm very pleased to have lots of work in the current exhibition at Walford Mill Crafts in Dorset, Knit 1, Mend 1, Keep 1, Change 1. They're showing several stitch-hacked and pattern-blagged pieces, along with my re-knitting sampler garment and a nice big version of my spectrum of re-knitting treatments. The exhibition is on until Sunday 1 March, and features work by other makers, including the fabulous Celia Pym. Highly recommended!

And now, here goes with a quick post about a really great day in January.

I was invited by Alex McLean to take part in a Hack the City event in Sheffield, in association with his 'Weaving Codes - Coding Weaves' research project. 

It was my first experience as a participant in a hack, and I found it really nice to have a day set aside for playful exploration, alongside interesting people from diverse backgrounds. 

I teamed up with Holger Ballweg, a live coder, to explore whether it was possible to write some code to convert a written knitting pattern into sounds. We based it on a traditional Shetland lace stitch - horseshoe - and used a free pattern from Knitting Bee. Towards the end of the day we tested the code with another lace stitch.

I have to confess that the division of labour felt rather unequal - Holger slaved away over creating a whole new lot of code, while I knitted a nice repetitive and familiar pattern! 

We made it so the speed of the sounds could be varied - at knitting speed (as in the first YouTube clip below), or much faster, which shows the repeats in the pattern quite effectively (and amusingly - click the second clip below). I think the version at knitting speed could (with lots of development and refinement) be useful for knitters, especially those with visual impairment.

Hopefully, we'll be able to develop this in the future... A big thank you to Holger for taking on my challenge, and for posting the clips online. You can read his blog post about the project, which includes a link to the source code, here.

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Lauren's wedding dress

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Earlier this year I completed a very special one-off project: making a wedding dress for my lovely friend Lauren.

It was a lot of fun to work with Lauren to develop her initial idea and make it real. I felt very proud on the big day!

When I told people I was making a wedding dress, they assumed it would be knitted. But no! I can sew too! Although - as you'll see - it was inevitable that some crochet would pop up in the trims...

Congratulations Lauren and Joe! And thank you, Lauren, for being such an incredibly laid-back bride!

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Celebrating ten years: the Backbone of Britain

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Yesterday I popped into knit mecca Prick Your Finger in Bethnal Green to firm up my exhibition-and-celebration plans with the lovely Rachael Matthews. We're celebrating ten years (to the day) of Keep & Share, with a party next Thursday. The exhibition will stay up for a month or so, including a range of pieces from the Keep & Share archive, plus a new work called The Backbone of Britain.

This work comes with a story.

It is made from a collection of twenty cardigans which my dad found stashed in a chest of drawers when he was clearing out my great aunt's house - hand knitted, seemingly unworn, all acrylic. Within the collection, there is a range of styles - although there are multiple versions of several patterns, knitted in different colours and sizes. We think my nana, Gladys (Auntie Alice's sister), knitted them - but can't be sure, as she died a few years before they were found. My nana was a prolific knitter, and taught me to knit when I was little, so this pile of cardigans felt emotionally significant, as well as representing a staggering amount of effort.

For obvious reasons, I ended up with this collection of cardigans. I didn't feel a desire to wear any of them - despite my cardigan fetish, I don't 'do' acrylic - but didn't feel I could get rid of them either. So, for years they were stashed away in a cupboard, and each time I saw them, I felt guilty.

Last autumn I reorganised the studio, and the cardigans re-emerged from the cupboard. Still, I didn't know what to do with them. The huge pile of knitting continued to lurk, as I shifted it from surface to surface in the studio. The cardigans needed to be resolved!

A little later in the autumn, I met my wonderful friend Celia Pym, told her about the cardigans and asked for her help. Celia - accompanied by Rachael - came to visit me in Hereford on a gloriously sunny day. We drank tea and ate cake and looked at the cardigans together... talked about them... played with them. As you will see in the photos, the weight of all this skill and time and effort weighed heavily on our shoulders for a while! (That's Celia with her head in her hands.) But as we talked and played, a plan began to emerge. The cardigans organised themselves into a new form which will be unveiled at Prick Your Finger in a week's time.

Nana, or whoever knitted these cardigans originally, made most of this work. I have just arranged it a little. Many, many thanks to Celia and Rachael for their help!

During the playing process, we were thinking about the amount of effort that women like my nana have put into catering (and over-catering) for their families' knitwear needs over the years. Rachael suggested that we might think of such effort as the Backbone of Britain - and the name stuck.

Please come and see! All are welcome at the tenth anniversary celebration on Thursday 21st August, 2014 at Prick Your Finger, 260 Globe Road, E2 0JD - join us to celebrate between 6pm and 9pm. I’ll be giving a slideshow talk – sharing my experiences of a decade in experimental slow fashion knitting – at 7pm. 

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Betty and Beary and their excellent knitwear

Sunday, March 2, 2014

After a break from blogging - due to being busy relocating from Hereford to Leeds (read more) - I'm back with another childhood making-related gem!

This time, it's my doll Betty (notable for her problem hair) and bear Beary (notable for his imaginative name) - and their awesome garter stitch knitwear. Betty's jumpsuit was definitely made by my mum... and the provenance of Beary's jumper is lost in the mists of time, though I, for one, would rather like to recreate its graphic simplicity in adult size.

In other news: PhD amendments approved, so I am all done! I've put the thesis abstract and some excerpts from the conclusion - including my key insights - on the website, here. If you'd like to read the full document, please contact me for a download link!

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Cave painting in a Vitalite tub

Monday, November 25, 2013

I've found a rich seam of material to mine in the 'things I made when I was young' theme. 

I've already shown you the first thing I (probably) sewed, and an over-accessorised donkey

But my making wasn't restricted to sewing and knitting - as demonstrated by this beautifully preserved (by my mum) 'Cave painting in a Vitalite tub'. 

Vitalite tubs = making in our house, being the ideal receptacle for all manner of craft materials. And versatile, too! This one provided the mould for my work of art, and then kept it protected so it could be photographed for a blog 25(ish) years later.

More childhood making coming soon!

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Superdonkey

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

As a bit of light relief from my thesis-related blog posts, I thought I would share another of my childhood making projects, which has somehow survived to the present day (minus one mitten).

I cannot recall exactly why I chose to knit a bonnet, jumper, cape and mittens for this donkey puppet ... but I'm glad I did!

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The first thing I ever sewed (maybe)

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Apropos of not much really, I thought I would show off my brown corduroy bear (or maybe it's a cat).

think it's the first thing I ever sewed, by myself. Unfortunately the annals of Twigger history didn't record how old I was ... we think maybe six.

I have a very vague memory of sitting in my parents' bedroom (where the sewing stuff was kept), making it. 

Here's my mum's memory: 'I remember thinking I could have explained about seams usually being on the inside if I'd been consulted prior to construction but managed not to say it at the time as you were so pleased with it...'

And I'm still pleased with it now! Particularly the experimental use of grain, and disregard for the conventions of matching thread colour... plus the backstitching is pretty good, considering.

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Little odd unexpected things

Friday, June 28, 2013

In my last post, I showed some photos I'd taken at the Leach Pottery in St. Ives - and promised I would document my own studio in a similar way.

It's been an interesting little exercise, which made me look in a slightly different way at the stuff I use every day. I've mainly focused on tools - there's something nice about the bits and pieces that are used in the process of making.

Of course, this visual snapshot doesn't show the piles of yarn, piles of knitwear and piles of paper also surrounding me... 

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Pilgrimage to the Leach Pottery

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

I seem to be using up all my words on my thesis (6 chapters done now!), conference papers (available here), book chapters and funding bids at the moment. Not too much brain-space left over for blog posts!

So here's a visual blog post, from my visit to the Leach Pottery in St. Ives last month. I found it quite moving to be in the former workspace of a maker I have read a lot about - and particularly special to see the homemade tools, and little odd unexpected things, around the workshop. 

On Thursday, I'll do a follow-up post documenting the tools and such around my own studio...

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14GB

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Let’s have another story in pictures – this time showing the stitch-hacking of my most recent piece, ’14GB’.

Update: see images of the finished piece here

14GB is on display in the Made in the Middle exhibition, along with three other stitch-hacked pieces and my pattern-blagged Shetland lace shawl (more info about those pieces here). Here’s some information about the exhibition:

Made in the Middle is an open exhibition originated by Craftspace and selected by an expert panel. Previously showing contemporary craft from the West Midlands, this year the exhibition has been expanded to include the East Midlands and celebrate creative practice across the whole region. This exhibition brings together 35 makers whose diverse practice reflects the wealth of high quality work produced across the region and the talent nurtured in the Midlands. 

The exhibition is at mac in Birmingham until 15 April, then it will tour the region for another fifteen months (further information on each venue can be found via the exhibition website):

The National Centre for Craft & Design, Sleaford, Lincolnshire 28th April – 1st July 2012

Shire Hall Gallery, Stafford 15th September 2012 – 27th October 2012

Rugby Art Gallery and Museum 15th January – 9th March 2013

Bilston Craft Gallery 23rd March 2013 – 11th May 2013

Northampton Museum and Art Gallery 25th May 2013 – 6th July 2013

At the preview of the exhibition at mac, I was delighted to be awarded the prize for ‘Best Overall Exhibit’. All those hours spent hacking and blagging were worth it…

COMMENTS FROM ORIGINAL BLOG POSTING:

Lois Parker 

so clever

 

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